Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Does Christian Charity Reach 'Illegals'?

By the Rev. Howard Bess
July 20, 2010

When the early Christians faced the challenge of bowing down to Caesar and obeying the Roman government or living by the teachings of Jesus, they followed the teachings of Jesus, becoming a persecuted people. Many lost their lives because of their commitment to their Christ.

Read on.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

How is it that Jesus would tell a person unlawfully entering another country that what they are doing is right? And, consequently, how can it be assumed that Jesus would simply embrace the lawbreakers illegally entering our country, especially when there is a legal method of doing so? There any many scriptures saying we should obey the laws of the land which coincide with scriptural morality. A law against the illegal crossing of our borders does not in any way violate that morality. Nations have borders and borders are to be honored. Also consider that a person dong the opposite, that is, illegally crossing the Mexican border from America to live there would in no wise be received with open arms either. There is a double standard and the God I've read the Bible to learn more about does not seem like the type to endorse this specific kind of lawbreaking, as this article presupposes.

Anonymous said...

How is it that Jesus would tell a person unlawfully entering another country that what they are doing is right? And, consequently, how can it be assumed that Jesus would simply embrace the lawbreakers illegally entering our country, especially when there is a legal method of doing so? There any many scriptures saying we should obey the laws of the land which coincide with scriptural morality. A law against the illegal crossing of our borders does not in any way violate that morality. Nations have borders and borders are to be honored. Also consider that a person dong the opposite, that is, illegally crossing the Mexican border from America to live there would in no wise be received with open arms either. There is a double standard and the God I've read the Bible to learn more about does not seem like the type to endorse this specific kind of lawbreaking, as this article presupposes.

Shineqi said...

This is far from a group of simple questions. The anonymous post seems to say that it is wrong to assist people in need or to resist linking that aid to serving as an arm of law enforcement.

I have two comments to Anonymous, one simple, the other not. First of all, for the vast majority of people entering the United States illegally, the laborers, there is no legal method of doing so. There is no line in which to wait.

My second comment has to do with helping people who are in need. I am the president of Water Station, a California-based non-profit. We go into the desert between March and October and place emergency water along the migrant trails. In doing so, we are not making a statement that we shouldn't have borders; we are not saying that it is acceptable to violate U.S. laws; we are making the statement that we don't want people to die in the desert.

We are all volunteers; some are persons of faith and this work is an outgrowth of their faith. Others are humanitarians who simply believe that life is sacred and that respect for life transcends national sovereignty.